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IDEAL SPECIFICATIONS OF DC MOTOR
- Jul 10, 2017 -

IDEAL SPECIFICATIONS OF DC MOTOR

Many motor manufacturers are now listing additional information that can be very useful when selecting the right motor. Below is some additional information you might come across when searching for DC motors:


Voltage vs. RPM:


Ideally, the manufacturer would list the graph of a motor’s voltage vs. rpm. For a quick approximate, consider using the no-load rpm and nominal voltage: (nominal voltage, rpm) and the point (0, 0). See “gear down” below for motors with a gear down.


Torque vs. Current:


Current is a value that cannot be easily controlled. DC motors use only as much current as they need. Ideal specifications include this curve, and approximations are not easily reproduced. The stall torque is related to the stall current. A motor that is prevented from turning will consume maximum (“stall”) current and produce the maximum torque possible. The current required to provide a given torque is based on many factors including the thickness, type and configuration of the wires used to make the motor, the magnets and other mechanical factors.


Technical specifications or 3D CAD drawing:


Many robot builders like to draw their robot on the computer before purchasing the necessary parts. Although all motor manufacturers have a CAD drawing with the dimensions, they rarely make it available to the public. Ideal motor dimensions include the basics listed above, as well as mounting hole locations and thread type. Ideally the materials used to make the motor, gears and winding as well as separate dimensions for the motor and the gear down would also be given.


Gear down:


DC motor manufacturers that also produce the corresponding gear down for a motor must list the gear down ratio. The gear down acts to increase torque and reduce rpm. The No Load RPM value given is always that of the last output shaft after the gear down. To find the angular velocity of the motor shaft before the gear down, multiply the value by the gear ratio. To obtain the motor’s stall torque before the gear down, divide the stall torque by the gear down. The material used to make the internal gears is usually plastic or metal and are chosen to be able to withstand the maximum torque ratin